How to Increase Productivity After the Christmas Break

Christmas has come and gone, and people have gradually gotten back into work. ‘Blue Monday’ is approaching on the 15th of January, a name given to the third Monday of this month due to the combination of post-Christmas blues, gloomy weather and work stress.

As a result, many will suffer from low mood, which not only affects their personal well being but also their productivity in the workplace. This article will reveal some of the best ways in which you can increase your productivity this January.

Reflect. In the beginning of the year, you may find it helpful to reflect on the year just passed. Think about both the good and the bad, and determine ways in which you would like to improve yourself. If there was anything you haven’t done or still wish to accomplish, plan and find a way to do just that. Reflecting on the past may be a motivating factor for you to achieve even more in the upcoming year.

Exercise. Although it might be difficult to get active if you’re not feeling yourself, exercising is one of the best things you can do for your body and mind. Exercise improves brain function and releases endorphins into your body that can boost your mood. Weight gain is also a main concern for many after Christmas, and exercising can help with that too.

Plan. Christmas might be over, but there are still plenty of things to look forward to in the New Year. Whether it is an evening out or going on a holiday with your friends, start planning events and perhaps write them down in a journal.

Talk. It’s important to connect with others so surrounding yourself with close friends and family is beneficial. Isolating yourself from people can worsen your spirits and exacerbate feelings of low self-worth and depression. Meeting up with people you love can not only distract you from home and workplace stressors, but will also remind you of the amazing people that bring joy and positivity into your life. Everyone is going through a similar phase, and talking about it can alleviate some of the symptoms.

Relax. There is an unspoken pressure everyone feels in January to do your best and look your best, as a new year usually signifies a new beginning. You might feel pressured to join a gym and get on a strict diet, or suddenly excel in work or fall in love. Therefore, self-care is critical at this time of year. In the midst of all the hubbub, remember to take care of yourself. Run a hot bath, and let yourself eat that slice of cake. Or two. Moderate indulgence is necessary for a well-balanced life, and it’s important not to forget that.

Finally, remind yourself that holiday blues come and go. However, if you are struggling with depressive symptoms and need support, it may help to talk to a professional at work or your healthcare provider.

Altruist Enterprises are a passionate and caring provider of Resilience, Stress Management and Mental Health First Aid training to organisations. To find out more and to download our free ‘Stress Management Checklist’, check out www.altruistuk.com.

Anna is a student writer and volunteer at Altruist Enterprises. She is currently studying a BSc in Psychology at the University of Birmingham. Having had personal experience with poor mental health herself, Anna is passionate in helping others who are experiencing similar issues. Working with Altruist Enterprises allows her to do just that.

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